Playing Around with Go

I’ve previously described my temperature monitoring solution, written in Python, and I’ve also described my various attempts at optimizing this solution, using NodeRED and Apache Camel, but all of these attempts have been focused on the server side, while the client has been mostly left to itself. The client runs on an old Raspberry Pi B+, with a total of 256MB RAM. The RPi also runs a surveillance camera, via the RPi camera module, which requires a memory split of 128 MB. [Read More]

Monitoring temperatures with Apache Camel

###Intro I’ve been trying out various technologies for my temperature monitoring project, but all of them have been more or less unstable. The python solution is by far the most robust, but can lose connection to the MQTT broker, and stubbornly refuse to reconnect by itself. The Node-RED solution is, while fast to write, notoriously unstable regarding MQTT connections. Connections sit “idle” showing a connected state, while in fact they are disconnected, and there is no obvious way of reconnecting it - apart from restarting the docker container. [Read More]

UniFi Cloud Key review

###Intro I’ve been running my UniFi controller off of a Raspberry Pi for a couple of years. It’s been running stable, and at no time did i feel it was underpowered for the task. Upgrading was a bit more cumbersome that i would have liked, but in the end it normally didn’t take longer than 10-15 minutes to perform an upgrade. When Ubiquiti announced the Cloud Key, which is essentially a Raspberry Pi 2 in an enclosure, with a POE option, i immediately knew i wanted one. [Read More]

Scheduling lights with Philips Hue and a Raspberry Pi

Up until a few weeks ago, i’ve been using IFTTT for controlling various automated light tasks. The lights i want to control are mostly outdoor lights, turning on at dusk, and off again at sunrise. I also automatically tone the light down and into a slight more red color in the kids rooms around bedtime, and in the living room a wee bit later :) IFTTT works, but is not very punctual. [Read More]

Temperature monitoring with Node-RED

I originally wrote my temperature monitoring software using Python, and while my Python solution works (almost) flawlessly, I recently became aware of Node-RED, a project initiated at IBM, meant as a controller for the Internet of things. When i read about Node-RED i wanted to try it out, so i decided to port my temperature/surveillance monitoring solution from python to Node-RED, and while i’m not much of a JavaScript fan, it actually worked out rather well. [Read More]

Monitoring temperatures with a Raspberry Pi.

I recently got into a discussion about dogs, kennels and temeratures. I have a German Shepherd, and he has a nice insulated dog house in his kennel, and the discussion was along the lines, how much heat does it take to warm up the doghouse, if it gets hotter than the outside at all. Now, a normal person would have solved this by putting a wireless meat thermometer in the doghouse, made a few readings of it with/without the dog, and compare it to the outside temperature. [Read More]

Replacing my Raspberry Pi 2 with my Synology NAS and Docker

I recently moved my server from a 2012 Mac Mini to a Raspberry Pi 2, and while the Pi 2 has been doing a great job, another option recently became available to me. I’ve been a long time user of Synology NAS products. Their products have great uptime, along with superior performance, mobile apps, file sharing etc. I’ve been using them since 2001, and have only had a single unit fail on me. [Read More]

Replacing my old server with a Raspberry Pi 2

I’ve been running a server at home for as long as i can remember. Over the years, the tasks performed by the server has varied greatly, from a complete mail/web/file server, to file/streaming/backup, and in it’s most recent incarnation, streaming/backup. Somewhere along the way (2008 or so), a Synology NAS snuck in, “hijacked” all our data, and streams to AirPlay and Chromecast devices. For the past 8 years, my server has been a Mac Mini, replaced every 3-5 years with the latest model. [Read More]

Sending notifications with MQTT and Pushover.net

I’ve improved a bit on my Pushover.net setup, described in this previous article. I started using MQTT, namely the Mosquitto broker for sending data to/from my machines, instead of the old point-to-point setup i was using. MQTT provides publish/subscribe, with messages up to 256MB each. It also features QoS, ranging from 0 - which basically just means the message was sent on the network, to 2, where you have guaranteed delivery of messages to the broker. [Read More]

Ubiquiti UniFi AC, Pro and coverage.

##Preface In my last post i reviewed the Ubiquiti UniFi AP, and while i was rather pleased with the performance, I wasn’t completely happy with the bandwidth available to me. The UniFi AP has a 100Mbit ethernet interface, and is capable of up to 300Mbit 802.11n, 2.4GHz only. In real world usage i saw bandwidth of 86Mbit, and while that is enough to stream four simultaneous HD streams, and fully saturate my 50⁄50 Mbit internet connection, it took a while to transfer files to/from my NAS. [Read More]